Wednesday, 26 Sep 2018

Privacy

Privacy Policy for 

The privacy of our visitors to  is important to us.

At , we recognize that privacy of your personal information is important. Here is information on what types of personal information we receive and collect when you use and visit , and how we safeguard your information. We never sell your personal information to third parties.

Log Files: As with most other websites, we collect and use the data contained in log files. The information in the log files include your IP (internet protocol) address, your ISP (internet service provider, such as AOL or Shaw Cable), the browser you used to visit our site (such as Internet Explorer or Firefox), the time you visited our site and which pages you visited throughout our site.

Cookies and Web Beacons: We do use cookies to store information, such as your personal preferences when you visit our site. This could include only showing you a popup once in your visit, or the ability to login to some of our features, such as forums.

Childrens Online Privacy Protection Act Compliance:

We are in compliance with the requirements of COPPA (Childrens Online Privacy Protection Act), we do not collect any information from anyone under 13 years of age. Our website, products and services are all directed to people who are at least 13 years old or older.

Seizing cloud data:

You love how easy it is to grab data from the cloud–and so do law enforcement agencies. And there’s only going to be more of that data to love in coming years: Gartner predicts that 36 percent of U.S. consumer content will be stored in the cloud by 2016.

But whether you use a Web-based email service, keep files in Google Drive, or upload photos to Shutterfly, everything you write, upload, or post gets stored in a server that belongs to the online service, not to you.

“A huge concern about using the cloud is that your data does not have the same Fourth Amendment protections that it would have if it were stored in a desk drawer or even your desktop computer,” says Consumer Watchdog’s Simpson.

Law-enforcement agencies are requesting cloud-based data with increasing (and unsettling) frequency. Google’s Transparency Report graphs a 70 percent increase in such requests over a span of three years, from 12,539 requests in the last six months of 2009 to 21,389 requests in the last six months of 2012.

Cloud services aren’t just rolling over, though. For example, Google might comply with a subpoena to reveal the name, contact information, and login records of a Gmail subscriber. But Google would insist that the requesting authority obtain a court order requiring Google to provide greater levels of detail, such as the mail header for a message. In addition, Google would demand to see aA search warrant before giving government investigators access to actual email content. Tellingly,Athe percentage of information requests that Google has fulfilled has dropped slightly over time, from about 75 percent in 2010 to about 66 percent in 2012. Twitter’s transparency reporting site offers similarly enlightening reading.

Contacting Us:

If there are any questions regarding this privacy policy you may contact us using the information below.

Contact Me on support@autotechadda.com